FAQs 2017-07-28T04:31:41+10:00

Frequently Asked Questions

The alarm will sound. Give us a call and we will arrange for a friendly technician to attend

Yes we do. We have our friendly technicians rostered on over the weekend including public holidays. Simply phone through on 1300 997 082 (this is monitored 24 hours a day and 365 days per year) and we will arrange for a technician to attend. Sometimes outside of normal business hours it may take a little while for your call to be answered, please be patient and make sure you tell the operator the property address, contact telephone number and details of the problem.

We commenced operation in February 1997 and further expanded the business in 2002 with the acquisition of Crystal Clear Wastewater Services.

Aerated Wastewater Treatment System

Is a purpose built system used for the treatment of sewerage and liquid wastes from a single household or multiple dwellings.

Wastewater is treated in stages in several separate chambers. The 1st chamber is similar to a conventional septic tank. The wastewater enters the chamber where the solids settle to the bottom and are retained in the tank forming a sludge layer. Scum collects at the top, and the partially clarified wastewater flows into a 2nd chamber. Here the wastewater is mixed with air to assist bacteria to further treat the wastewater. A 3rd chamber allows additional clarification through the settling of solids, which are returned for further treatment to either the septic chamber or to the aeration chamber. The clarified effluent is disinfected in a further chamber before irrigation can take place. Anaerobic bacteria in the 1st chamber break down the solid matter in the sludge and scum layers, while Aerobic bacteria further break the material down within the aeration chamber. Material that cannot be fully broken down gradually builds up over time in the system and must be pumped out.

NSW Department of Health determines and approves the design and structural requirements for all AWTS’s. Local councils are responsible for the approval for the installation of domestic AWTS’s. The approval to operate is usually subject to renewed each year. Local councils are also responsible for the ongoing monitoring of the systems by undertaking random on site inspections, reviewing the Service Report which is prepared by the contractor after each service and forwarded to council. It is considered a public health issue to ensure all AWTS are properly designed, installed and serviced.

Poorly maintained AWTS’s are a serious source of water pollution and may present health risks, cause odours and attract disease carrying vermin and insects. By looking after your treatment system you can do your part in helping to protect the environment and the health of your family.

All systems are fitted with an alarm having a light and an audible sound which will indicate mechanical or electrical equipment malfunctions. The sound may be muted by the home owner but the warning light can only be reset by the service contractor.

The smell of sewage, wastewater pooling around the system, water pooling in the irrigated area, water that drains slowly or backs up in sinks and drains, excessive noise from the blower or pumping equipment, poor vegetation growth in the irrigated area and odour from the vent on the AWTS. Call your service contractor to rectify the system.

Local councils approve and monitor the systems but the home owner must arrange and pay for the quarterly maintenance and repair of their AWTS by an approved contractor. All costs are borne by the home owner

Use biodegradable detergents with low levels of sodium and phosphorous, use only the recommended amounts of detergent, have your system maintained and serviced by an approved contractor and be conservative with your use of water within the household such as dishwashers/washing machines.

Don’t use large quantities of bleaches, disinfectants, whiteners, nappy soakers and spot removers. Don’t allow any foreign materials such as nappies, sanitary napkins, condoms or other hygiene products to enter the system. Don’t put large quantities of fats and oils in the system; keep food waste out of the system. Don’t switch off power to the AWTS, even if you go away on holidays.

Overloading is caused by large volumes of water entering the system over a short period of time. A large number of showers and loads of washing clothes/dishes. These usually occur when there are additional members to the household. The best way to prevent the problem is to attempt to spread your water usage throughout the day. E.g. some showers in the morning while others at night with clothes washing in the middle of the day.

The 1st chamber in the AWTS is similar to a conventional septic tank. The wastewater enters the chamber where the solids settle to the bottom and are retained in the bottom of the tank forming a sludge layer. Bacteria in the chamber breaks down the solid matter in the sludge. Material that cannot be fully broken down gradually builds up over time in the chamber and must be pumped out. The frequency for each system varies with usage however it is usually every 5 to 10 years.

We certainly do install systems. We are an independent installer, so that means we can recommend the best system for the situation.

Whether it be a straightforward easy access location, or restricted access or special environment concerns such as problem soils where nitrogen is an issue.

We also install irrigation systems associate with wastewater systems, whether they are trenches for an old style septic tank, above ground sprays, subsurface drip line, conventional pressure dosed beds, raised pressure dosed beds or even Wisconsin Mounds, we can assist.

Modifying your existing residence on an unsewered lot may require the review of the wastewater requirements for the site. Talk to us before submitting plans to council and we may be able to assist. Many councils’ require a Wastewater Management Plan to be prepared for the site prior to granting any approval, depending on what sort of modifications are proposed. We can assist with the preparation of the Wastewater Management Report; our years of experience will assist you in getting the right solution.

Building a granny flat on an existing unsewered residence will place additional pressure on the existing septic or AWTS system. Many councils’ require a Wastewater Management Plan to be prepared for the site prior to granting any approval. We can assist with the preparation of the Wastewater Management Report; our years of experience will assist you in getting the right solution.

A Wastewater Management Plan is a consultant’s report which analysis the physical aspects of the property, looks at the wastewater requirements of the development and produces a solution. It involves visiting the site, analysing the soil, looking at the proposed development, understanding the owner’s requirements and proposing a specific system and irrigation method. In short it is the solution to the disposal of wastewater on the site. Our reports will address your specific requirements for the property and provide the right answers.

There is nothing wrong with, them however over time better levels of wastewater treatment have become available. An old style septic system provides effluent treat to a primary stage i.e. effectively solids are removed, the AWTS offer secondary treatment of effluent which is more environmentally friendly and significantly reduces the health risks associated with wastewater disposal.